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Matthew Levitt is a Member in the firm’s Boston office. Matt’s practice encompasses a range of litigation matters, including False Claims Act defense, securities litigation, complex civil litigation, and white collar criminal defense. He regularly advises clients at all stages of civil and criminal litigation, from pre-litigation counseling and investigation through discovery, trial, and the appeals process.

A recent First Circuit decision raises the pleading bar for plaintiffs asserting violations of Section 11 of the Securities Act. Only would-be plaintiffs who acquired a security that is the direct subject of a prospectus and registration statement are entitled to sue under Section 11. That right to sue is limited to plaintiffs who either purchased their shares directly in the offering, or who otherwise can trace their shares back to the relevant offering. This has been referred to as the “traceability” requirement. Until now, Section 11 plaintiffs have generally sought to establish standing by pleading a simple statement to the effect that they “purchased shares of stock pursuant and/or traceable to the offering.” For companies whose stock is all traceable to a single offering, this pleading burden presents little burden, as all shares self-evidently derive from the offering. But when stock has been issued in multiple offerings, a plaintiff has to plead that his or her shares were issued under the allegedly false or misleading registration statement, and not some other registration statement.

Continue Reading First Circuit Strengthens “Traceability” Pleading Requirement for Section 11 Claims